The Struggle of Life After Prison

The Marshall Project is a news organization that brings awareness about the criminal justice system and allows up to see the effects of prison life on inmates.

This project is a non-profit organization that addresses issues about the U.S. criminal justice system through award winning journalism and news outlets.

The struggle of adjusting to life after prison is a real issue that most inmates struggle with. The Marshall Project reports on these issues.

Short Video about the Marshal Project

In all of our work we strive to educate and enlarge the audience of people who care about the state of criminal justice.

Is there a way to make this adjustment easier? Are their resources available to inmates after they are released?

“No one should be forced to serve a life sentence after they’ve paid their debt to society,” says Koufos, adding that businesses from around the country are asking how they can tap into the talent pipeline flowing from prisons.

The odds of regaining a normal life without limitations after a prison is not something that many inmates ever see.

While I know I earned my freedom, I may be eternally undeserving of forgiveness. It’s something I continue to work toward without expectations. It’s how I live with myself.

Matthew Charles Struggle to adjust to life after prison

Matthew Charles snuggled to adjust to civilian life after being released from prison. He spent 22 years behind bars for selling crack cocaine.

Starting over isn’t easy, Charles says. But it makes a world of difference when someone is rooting for you.

The stigma and afterlife that haunts each inmate is something you cant escape but the support behind each inmate can help make the situation easier.

“Unfortunately,” Senghor said. “When people are sentenced, that sentence never ends — even when they step out of prison.”

‘Ear Hustle’ Allowing an inside edition of what daily prison life is like and the inmates life after

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s